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Mike Bryant
Mike Bryant
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Just Because It’s Twitter, You Still Can’t Text And Drive

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My partner Joe Crumley wrote a great piece about the dangers of texting. He, like a number of other writers here at the InjuryBoard, continue to point out the dangers of texting and driving. Go watch the video that a couple of members have posted.

A recent study concerning the social networking tool, Twitter, points out there is more reason for concern. According to Crowd Science, about 11% of Twitter users admitted to accessing social media while driving in the preceding 30 days, compared to only 5% of other social media users. 29% of Twitter users said they had accessed social media from cars at some point in the past, compared with 13% of non-users. This is one too many people reading and twittering while they should be driving.

Since this post will go out on a tweet, I truly hope not one single person reads it while they’re driving. It makes you wonder how broad we need to make the law to make sure that people get the idea. A number of other interesting findings from the study:

- 41% of Twitter users prefer to contact friends via social media rather than telephone, compared with 25% of non-Twitter social media users, and 11% (vs. only 6% of those not using Twitter) actually prefer social media over face-to-face contacts.

– More than twice as many males than females (32% to 15%) access Twitter primarily through a third-party application.

– 43% of Twitter users employ a third-party application at least some of the time, and 26% as their main mode of access.

– Twitter users tend to be older than non-Twitter social media users (54% over 30 years old, vs. 42%), twice as likely to be self-employed or entrepreneurs (18% vs. 9%) and to be planning to start a business during the next six months, and more tech-savvy (24% vs. 15%

Driving needs to be driving time.