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Mike Bryant
Mike Bryant
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The Executive Branch Does Affect the Judiciary

2 comments

There is a separation of powers in the US Constitution and in state constitutions. It’s very clear that the Executive, Legislative, and the Judiciary are to remain as separate checks on the power of each other. That being said, when the executive branch is held for a long time by a single person, there is a huge effect on the judiciary

The final numbers for the Pawlenty administration were:

A total of 132 judge appointments, which broke down to:

  • Three Chief Justices of the Supreme Court
  • Four associate judges of the Supreme Court
  • One Chief Judge of the Court of Appeals
  • Nine associate judges
  • 106 district judges
  • One Chief Judge of the office of Administrative Hearing
  • Three judges to the Tax Court
  • Five judges to the Workers Compensation Court of Appeals.

Now each of these judges come in with their own minds and way of doing things. But, that is a lot of opinions coming from one place. It will have an affect on Minnesota law long after the Presidential hopes have been dashed along the rocks of some future primary.

2 Comments

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  1. Jon Lewis says:
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    It would be okay if they didn’t legislate and change laws. Problem is way too few jury trials. People want freedom but don’t want to work for it. It’s work to serve on a jury, but juries are the great equalizers when one President does get to appoint a lot of Judges. Problem is: many of these judges don’t let cases get to the jury. They throw them out on summary judgement or send them to arbitration.

    Our founding fathers were smart. They knew what they were doing when they put the jury system in our Constitution. The jury was almost like a fourth branch of government. Summary judgements are overused which gives even more power to Presidents and judges.

  2. Mike Bryant says:
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    The summery judgment ruling have been getting way out of hand. Thanks for the comment.